DBT and AA

Step One

We admitted that we were powerless over our addiction, that our lives had become unmanageable.

 

*Admitted that when we participate in drinking, drugging and acting out behavior that our lives get out of control

  • Wise Mind
  • What Skills (Observe, Describe, Participate)
  • How Skills (Nonjudgmental, One Mindfully, Effectiveness)
  • FAST
  • Pros and Cons
  • Radical Acceptance
  • Values and Priorities (Building a Life Worth Living) (DBT-SUD)
  • Cheerleading Statements

Step Two

Came to believe that a power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.

 

*Came to believe that we could change with the help of others.

  • Wise Mind
  • What Skills (Observe, Describe, Participate)
  • How Skills (Nonjudgmental, One Mindfully, Effectiveness)
  • Values and Priorities (Building a Life Worth Living) (DBT-SUD)
  • Willingness versus Willfulness
  • IMPROVE the Moment
  • Observing Your Breath

Step Three

Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.

*Made a decision to work with others to make changes in our behavior and our value system.

  • Wise Mind
  • What Skills (Observe, Describe, Participate)
  • How Skills (Nonjudgmental, One Mindfully, Effectiveness)
  • FAST
  • Values and Priorities (Building a Life Worth Living) (DBT-SUD)
  • Willingness versus Willfulness
  • Turning the Mind
  • Burning Your Bridges (DBT-SUD)
  • Let Go of Emotional Suffering
  • Cheerleading Statements
  • Avoiding and Eliminating the Cues to Use (DBT-SUD)

Step Four

Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

 

*Made a list of behaviors we need to change and recognized the positive strengths that will help us make these changes.

  • Nonjudgmental Stance
  • Observe and Describe
  • Values and Priorities (Building a Life Worth Living) (DBT-SUD)
  • Radical Acceptance
  • FAST
  • Willingness versus Willfulness
  • Wise Mind
  • Identifying and Labeling Emotions
  • Urge Surfing (DBT-SUD)

Step Five

Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

 

*Shared our list with another person.

  • Wise Mind
  • What Skills (Observe, Describe, Participate)
  • How Skills (Nonjudgmental, One Mindfully, Effectiveness)
  • Values and Priorities (Building a Life Worth Living) (DBT-SUD)
  • Radical Acceptance
  • Willingness versus Willfulness
  • DEAR MAN
  • GIVE
  • FAST

Step Six

We were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.

 

*Were ready to leave these old behaviors, attitudes and values behind.

  • Wise Mind
  • Willingness versus Willfulness
  • Turning the Mind
  • Burning Your Bridges
  • Avoiding and Eliminating the Cues to Use (DBT-SUD)

Step Seven

Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.

 

*Became willing to work with others to change these old behaviors, attitudes and values.

  • Wise Mind
  • What Skills (Observe, Describe, Participate)
  • DEAR MAN
  • FAST
  • Effectiveness

 

Step Eight

Made a list of all the persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.

 

*Made a list of people, including myself, who have been hurt by our behavior and decided to make amends to them.

  • Wise Mind
  • What Skills (Observe, Describe, Participate)
  • How Skills (Nonjudgmental, One Mindfully, Effectiveness)
  • Willingness versus Willfulness
  • Cheerleading Statements
  • FAST
  • Building a Life Worth Living (DBT-SUD)

Step Nine

Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

 

*Took responsibility for our behavior and for forgiving ourselves by making amends to people who have been hurt by our behavior.

  • Wise Mind
  • DEAR MAN
  • GIVE
  • FAST
  • Attend to Relationships (Building a Life Worth Living) (DBT-SUD)
  • Cheerleading Statements
  • Alternate Rebellion (DBT-SUD)
  • Half Smile
  • IMPROVE the moment
  • Opposite to Emotion Action

Step Ten

Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.

 

*Continue to take responsibility for ourselves and admit when we are wrong.

  • Wise Mind
  • Nonjudgmental Stance
  • Observe and Describe
  • ABC PLEASE
  • FAST
  • Turning the Mind
  • Willingness versus Willfulness
  • Urge Surfing (DBT-SUD)
  • Opposite to Emotion Action (for changing Shame)
  • Alternate Rebellion (DBT-SUD)
  • Adaptive Denial (DBT-SUD)

 

Step Eleven

Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God, as we understood Him, praying only for the knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.

 

*Tried, with the help of others, to be a better person—someone we can be proud of and live with.

  • Wise Mind
    • What Skills (Observe, Describe, Participate)
    • How Skills (Nonjudgmental, One Mindfully, Effectiveness)
    • Self-Sooth
    • IMPROVE the Moment
    • Observing Your Breath
    • ABC PLEASE
    • Willingness not Willfullness
    • FAST
  • Building a Life Worth Living (DBT-SUD)

Step Twelve

Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to addicts who still suffer, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

 

*Having been able to change our lives with the help of others, we offer our help to others.

  • Wise Mind
  • What Skills (Observe, Describe, Participate)
  • How Skills (Nonjudgmental, One Mindfully, Effectiveness)
  • DEAR MAN
  • GIVE
  • FAST
  • Building a Life Worth Living (DBT-SUD)


 

The Serenity Prayer

God, grant me the serenity to radically accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

  • Wise Mind
  • Radical Acceptance
  • Increasing Positive Emotions
  • Wise Mind ACCEPTS
  • ABC PLEASE
  • Willingness versus Willfulness
  • FAST
  • Urge Surfing (DBT-SUD)

“One Day At A Time”

Not using just for today.  Focusing on today’s responsibilities.

  • Wise Mind
  • One Mindfully
  • Effectiveness
  • Radical Acceptance
  • Turning the Mind
  • Willingness versus Willfulness
  • Alternate Rebellion (DBT-SUD)
  • Adaptive Denial (DBT-SUD)
  • Urge Surfing (DBT-SUD)
  • Wise Mind ACCEPTS
  • IMPROVE the Moment
  • Self-Sooth
  • Pros and Cons
  • ABC PLEASE
  • Opposite to Emotion Action
H.A.L.T. 

Don’t let yourself get too Hungry, Angry, Lonely or Tired.

  • Wise Mind
  • ABC PLEASE
  • Opposite to Emotion Action (for Anger
  • Building a Life Worth Living (DBT-SUD)

Author Unknown

 

One Response to DBT and AA

  1. Scotty says:

    What genuinely encouraged you to write “DBT and AA | Dialectical Behavior Therapy Center”?
    I personallytruly appreciated it! Thanks a lot ,Lucretia

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